What school in Philadelphia did the Quakers open today?

sealJune 28, 1770 — French-born American abolitionist and educator Anthony Benezet today founded one of the world’s first anti-slavery societies — the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage.

He ran it until his death in 1784, and also founded the first public school for girls in North America; and the Negro School at Philadelphia, which operated into the 19th century.

After his death, it was revived as the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Benezet left his entire estate to the continuation of his pursuit of this cause.

Sources: archstreetfriends.org, paabolition.org, benezet.org

Words of Wisdom for June 28, 2016

“If we continually bear in mind the royal law of doing to others as we would be done by, we shall never think of bereaving our fellow creatures of that valuable blessing liberty, nor endure to grow rich by their bondage. To live in ease and plenty by the toil of those whom violence and cruelty have put in our power is neither consistent with Christianity nor common justice.”

— Anthony Benezet, (January 31, 1713 – May 3, 1784), a French-born American abolitionist and educator who was active in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. One of the early American abolitionists, Benezet founded one of the world's first anti-slavery societies, the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage (after his death it was revived as the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery); the first public school for girls in North America; and the Negro School at Philadelphia, which operated into the 19th century